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Plans for asphalt plant to be re-evaluated

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Those costs would likely be borne by taxpayers.

There was an urgency to the questions asked of council Tuesday night because the homeowners must put down their second deposit (three per cent of the total cost, on top of the two per cent already on deposit) by Nov. 27, the day following a public open house where some of the questions could be answered.

Frémont pointed out that it gives them 12 hours to make a decision on whether they want to live there or not.

At that beginning of the discussion Tuesday the mayor's response was: "What we can't do is make your decision for you."

He said council was concerned about it and committed to clean air in the neighbourhood. But in the end, he said, it was the homeowners' decision.

"It's going to come down to your investment and getting comfortable with the decision to be there," he said.

The mayor's position changed about two hours later in the wake of more unanswered questions, and more outrage about the plan.

When asked if there was any one comment that stood out, the mayor highlighted Susan Stacey's comments. She has lived in the area next to the asphalt plant for years.

What she told council was: "The emissions are pretty nasty."

"You have to hold your breath for long periods of time because you can't breathe," she added, describing what it's like walking her dog in the area sometimes.

In the end council agreed to get staff to work on the unanswered questions, including the cost of moving the plant, potential relocation sites and to investigate the legal ramifications of the zoning. Council also agreed to ask the WDC to extend the second deposit date.

"This is a change in course," admitted Melamed to the crowded auditorium at MY Millennium Place after hours of taking angry and frustrated questions from homeowners.

"It's given us renewed impetus and impact in our conversations with Whistler Aggregates."

Councillor Eckhard Zeidler urged the residents to work with council in a non-adversarial way to find solutions.

"It should have been dealt with a long time ago," he admitted.

"The price has gone up tonight because we zoned out on this a while back."

 

 

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