Overexposed: The naked truth behind Whistler’s iconic Toad Hall poster 

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Photo by Chris Speedie / Courtesy of Terry Spence
The iconic Toad Hall photo that still manages to pique curiosities 42 years later.
Photo by George Benjamin Collection / Courtesy of the Whistler Museum
People hanging out at another popular local squat of the era, Tokum Corners, in 1980.
Photo by George Benjamin Collection / Courtesy of the Whistler Museum
A man poses in front of the second Toad Hall in the Soo Valley.
Photo by George Benjamin Collection / Courtesy of the Whistler Museum
Whistlerites finding anywhere to work and party in 1973.
Photo by George Benjamin Collection / Courtesy of the Whistler Museum
A couple Toad Hall residents catch some sun.
Photo by George Benjamin Collection / Courtesy of the Whistler Museum
Casual nudity was par for the course during Whistler’s hippie era. At Jordon’s Lodge on Nita Lake, circa 1974.
Photo by George Benjamin Collection / Courtesy of the Whistler Museum
The exterior of the Soo Valley Toad Hall.
Photo submitted by Dawn MaCleod
A wake was held in 2000 for Toad Hall photographer Chris Speedie that brought some of the old gang back together.
Photo by George Benjamin Collection / Courtesy of the Whistler Museum
The ski bums who frequented Toad Hall sometimes jokingly referred to themselves as Canada’s Underpaid National Ski Team, or, more commonly, the Unemployment Insurance Ski Team.
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