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Pee-yew - who let the skunk into the house?

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Albino hummingbird flaps way into Salida

SALIDA, Colo. - An albino hummingbird was seen - and photographed - in Salida. A local Audubon Society representative told the Mountain Mail that it was only the third albino hummingbird documented in Colorado.

"Pure albino hummingbirds, like this one, are pure white, with pinkish bill, feet and eyes as a result of having no melanin pigment in their skin, eyes or feathers," said SeEtta Moss.

 

Bigfoot in Banff?

BANFF, Alberta - Banff National Park will soon be on the Discovery Animal Channel show "Finding Bigfoot." A bigfoot research organization called Sylvanic claims to have documented a bigfoot in Banff and Kootenay national parks through hair samples and on video. An episode of the TV series will investigate those claims.

The Rocky Mountain Outlook observes that the publicity might well draw tourists. "We're always thrilled when people want to come and explore the landscape, but this is certainly a new twist to it," said Julie Canning, chief executive of Banff Lake Louise Tourism.

The newspaper notes that there were rumors of a sighting of an ape-like bipedal bigfoot, also called sasquatch, in Canmore, just outside Banff National Park. Sightings of a Bigfoot were also reported on the shores of Lake Minnewanka. The latter sighting was later confirmed as a hoax.

 

John Denver summit?

CARBDONALE, Colo. - Old-timers are now speaking out against a proposal to name a portion of Mt. Sopris, the stately two-summited peak that presides over the Roaring Fork Valley, in honour of the late singer John Denver.

A woman from metropolitan Denver proposes the name for the east summit of the 13,953-foot peak. It has little chance of happening, however, as the authority in such matters, the U.S. Board of Geographic Names, invariably wants to know what local governments have to say.

The most important local government in this case, the Pitkin County Board of Commissioners, first heard the idea several years ago. Their response, says Dorothea Farris, a county commissioner then, was: "You've got to be kidding me."

Farris, a former school teacher in Aspen and a long-time member of the Aspen School District Board of Education, worked with Denver, who made a special effort to teach school kids in Aspen about the outdoors. She believes that Denver would have wanted no part of having even a portion of the peak named after him.