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Letters to the editor

Comic thanks, what's with paying to park, it's a team effort,
parents say thanks, recycle and reuse, Michael Henderson
on getting out of the park, more on first nations
and on global warming

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Smiles, chuckles and thanks

I just wanted to put a huge, smiling, chuckling, load of thanks out to all the people who came out to the comedy for a cause shows in support of the Whistler Adaptive Sports Program this past weekend.

As one of the comedians I would like to thank you on their behalf as we all had a great time making you laugh. You all seemed to be having such a good time that it just fed right back into the show and made them two great nights at the GLC.

And I would like to thank you even more on behalf of the Whistler Adaptive Sports Program. Our program tries as hard as we can to focus on a person's abilities rather than their disabilities so that we can get them out enjoying the wind on their face in the great outdoors. We are fortunate to have many incredibly dedicated volunteers, but we also need as much financial support as we can get. Some companies, like Scotiabank and Whistler-Blackcomb, have been very generous, but we are thrilled when we can put on events like this weekend's comedy show so that the public can come out and support us as well. (And special thanks to Mike Varrin of the GLC for his continued support.)

It is through your support over the years that we have been able to grow from just offering alpine ski programs to where we can now offer snowboard and cross-country skiing programs as well as many summer programs such as kayaking and biking.

So thank you and thank you on behalf of both the comedians and the Whistler Adaptive Sports Program.

PS: Live comedy is a rare event in this town so keep going out and supporting it when it comes.

Pete Crutchfield

Comedian, member of the Board of Directors for W.A.S.P.

 

Carrots, sticks and climate

Re: Pay parking raise ire of local driver (Pique, April 5)

Everybody seems to be concerned now about global warming. Yet, when a simple measure is proposed to limit the convenience of operating a device that makes a big contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, the initiative is still met with resistance. Faced with the spectre of pay parking, the indignant motorist asks, “Why does my life have to change?” I suggest the answer is, “So that the climate doesn’t change.”

Technology alone cannot spare us the worst consequences of global warming. We must all be willing to make individual lifestyle adjustments if we hope to deal with the issue effectively. Sometimes necessary behavioural change requires financial “sticks”. But maybe pay parking would be more palatable to the public if combined with a carrot in the form of free transit throughout the valley. Then maybe we’d finally have a large contingent of longtime locals riding the buses, a mode so far principally patronized by visitors, transients and seasonal residents.

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