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What’s in your fridge? On the shelves with bike fixer and cream lover, James Barrett

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James Barrett confesses with a laugh that what he eats is probably 180 degrees opposite of what most people would imagine. For this former road bike racer and current owner/chief bike fixer/parts manufacturer at The Fix in Function Junction, it’s not all carrot juice and complex carbs these days.

“If it’s got cream in it I want it,” James says from his home in The Glades at Spring Creek that he shares with his wife — artist and filmmaker Rebecca Wood Barrett — and their year-old son, Oliver.

In fact, his diet these days is pretty much a rejection of all things — including bananas — that fuelled him through years of bike racing back in Sydney, Australia. This in combo with food he couldn’t eat, like all things dairy and fatty that are mucous-inducing and/or hard for the body to break down.

The latter, however, are not Becky’s favourites. Still, they’ve managed to find a middle ground until James “lashes out” and chugs a whole bottle of milk, or enhances his side of a pizza with an extra three inches of mozzarella, while Becky takes hers straight up.

In the end, she does most of the cooking, and baking, turning out everything from strudels to fabulous banana bread (that’s how James gets his banana fix), with James tossing in a creamy or BBQ’ed dish every so often.

As for the fridge, it’s only steps from the front door, a big black GE number (notice the “big”) facing the rear of the house. It came with the condo, circa mid-1990s, when black appliances were happening.

It’s a Tuesday evening when James and I go through the family fridge. Normally on Tuesdays, he and Becky get a delivery from SPUD (Small Potatoes Urban Delivery) in Vancouver. But not this Tuesday, which is likely a good thing as not much else could fit.

After all his ranting about high-fat dairy, it’s funny that the first thing he lays his hands on is a liter of two per cent milk, three-quarters empty. The homogenized stuff — the real stuff, he calls it — went with him to work, where a stash of Cheerios awaits.

Beside the milk is Sun-Rype Apple Juice and a bevy of assorted containers, including purple Tupperware with an aqua green lid containing cherry tomatoes. Others hold carrots, celery and brightly coloured peppers — green and yellow — chopped into bite-sized pieces for Oliver at daycare, chopped red onion, and something creamy. There’s also a jar of medium Tostitos Salsa nearing its due date.

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