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Escape Route bringing Chic Scott to Whistler

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What's up with WAC?

As of Jan. 1, public access to MY Millennium Place has been cut off as the facility is transformed for the Olympic period into the Whistler Media House, for members of the unaccredited media, and Norway House. While this means that Whistler Arts Council (WAC) has had to shut its doors to walk-in traffic, it doesn't mean that the WAC team has stopped working.

On the contrary: they're busy working on a variety of projects for Whistler Live! and their own summer programs. They've also paused their annual Winter Performance Series for the Olympics. Following the Games, two more events are on the calendar for mid-April: a musical performance by Matt Anderson and Wil, and a theatrical performance by Dufflebag Theatre.

Basically, anyone who wishes to meet with WAC staff should call ahead or e-mail to gain admission to the offices (604-935-8232 or info@whistlerartscouncil.com .) MY Place will be reopened for public programming by mid to late March.

 

Unearthing a buried treasure

Vance Shaw, the former principal cinematographer for Teton Gravity Research (TGR) has just wrapped up a new project on another "town that skis."

He has filmed, directed and produced "REV: A Buried Treasure," a unique documentary-style film that takes a heartfelt look at the people who call Revelstoke home. Emotions run high as this historic mountain town undergoes a transformation into a world-class ski area, with locals, visitors and athletes sharing their stories of a snow-seeker's gem cultivated by a group of passionate visionaries and snoweaters.

"Shaw doesn't shy away from the myriad of emotions surrounding the transformation of Revelstoke - from a sleepy industrial mountain town, to a world-class ski and snowboard destination," said Jason Tross of freeskier.com.

"The documentary uses skiing as a vehicle to identify what people love about the town, mountains and snow of Revelstoke they chose to make a permanent part of their lives. This film's greatest value is its rare documentation of the human story and potential boomtown in its infancy."

The finished product will be screened at The Pony in Pemberton on Wednesday, Jan. 27 and again in Whistler on Thursday, Jan. 28 at the GLC.

 

 

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