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Typical of Whistler, no one publishes a book for several years and then we get three in one week, with two more to be published next month. Whistler residents Walter Zebrowski, Pat Wastell Norris and Peter Vogler all had books published in the last week or two. Janet Love Morrison, Florence Petersen and Sally Mitchell are planning to launch their two-volume history of Whistler next month. The seemingly sudden proliferation of books is further evidence of the rich, diverse group of people who have come from all over the world to live in Whistler. But of course the books have not "suddenly" appeared out of nowhere. Vogler’s is a collection of Village Voice columns he has written over the years for the Whistler Question. Norris’ book sketches her family history and the parallel history of Telegraph Cove on northern Vancouver Island. Zebrowski’s book, In Search of Freedom, is an account of his 82 years, stretching from his native Poland, through Western Europe, Siberia and the Middle East during the Second World War, to Canada and finally his "retirement" in Whistler. As many Whistler people know, Zebrowski probably has enough material for a couple of books just based on his time in Whistler. Stories of him driving himself to hospital after a heart attack, hiking up and down Sproatt Mountain to fix the television antennas which brought TV to Whistler, and his nearly single-handed efforts to stop BC Hydro putting power lines right through the centre of the valley in the early 1960s are well known to many. Less recognized are his contributions to building the arena and his early efforts at fish enhancement. What the three authors also provide with their work is perspectives on life; perspectives on Whistler and from Whistler. These perspectives in themselves make the books worthwhile reading for Whistlerites and those who appreciate what we have today.

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