Opinion » Maxed Out

Please Santa, give us a little outrage



Dear Santa:

Well, it's that time of year again. Peace on Earth — or what's left of it; Earth that is, peace has already been completely shot to hell — and goodwill toward... oh, what the heck. What say we just get right down to it and cut the charade, Nick. Okay?

As usual, I'm not really askin' for anything for myself. I feel unusually blessed and short of you having the magic to turn all the food I really love into health food, well, you can use that space in your sack for some of these other things.

I'd like you to bring a little outrage along for pretty well every Canadian. My, we are a complacent bunch.

In the past couple of weeks, we've watched our as our Supreme Leader has been proven to be a knowing liar — that would be the fiasco surrounding the country's "procurement procedure" for the F-35 fighter jet — and someone who, caught in the lie, simply guts the fundamental principles and institutions of Parliament to cover it up.

And then, of course, there's the sycophantic pandering to China, Alberta's and the Conservative's last, best, albeit sinking, hope of propping up the overextended bitumen bidniz. I'm sure we'll all be happy learning Mandarin and moving back into the Middle Ages.

But there's every indication even this wholesale sellout of the country — on top of the already too familiar list of grievances ranging from environmental malevolence, to election rigging, to gagging scientists when their findings fail to square with the Harpocritical agenda — isn't going to be enough to light a fire under mindlessly complacent Canadians pining away for hockey. Today's top story in the country's putative national newspaper, the story more people are following and emailing to their friends, is about a damn pet monkey wearing a swish coat and shopping at Ikea, a store, ironically, I've often likened to a jungle.

So please, Santa, a little outrage. A little backbone. A little perspective.

And while we're on the subject, I know only too well what a struggle print journalism is going through these days. But could you possibly do something, anything, for that national newspaper. It's bad enough the Globe & Mail has started charging $20 a month for access to their online paper — a price I'm not willing to pay and, no, I'm not asking for a subscription — but really, have you looked at it lately. Criminy, it looks like freakin' Cosmopolitan or something. Everything's all "5 TV Shows to Fall Asleep to Tonight," or "10 Stock Picks Sure to Tank," or "12 Christmas Gifts Your Pet Needs." Jeez, Santa, for that drivel they'd have to pay me.

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